Call for Papers Int’l Seminar “Geospatial and Human Dimensions on Sustainable Natural Resource Management”

Dear friends and colleagues,

 

Center for Regional System Analysis, Planning and Development (CrestPent), Bogor Agricultural University (IPB) will host the International Seminar on”Geospatial and Human Dimensions on Sustainable Natural Resource Management” on 12-13 September 2011 at IPB International Convention Center,Bogor City. We invite colleagues to participate in writing papers (call for papers) in the Seminar which will be divided into 5 Sessions / Group Discussionswith each of the themes (although not limited to these) are in parentheses:

1.Geospatial (Emerging Geospatial Information Retrievels and Applications)

2.Spatial Planning (Political Dimensions on National and Local Spatial Planning)

3.The Commons (Local Institution in Natural Resources Management)

4.Food and Environment (Climate Change Induced Environmental Degradation and Food Crisis)

5 Jabodetabek (Jakarta-Bogor-Depok-Tangerang-Bekasi) Metropolitan Area Studies

 

Several important dates wich should be noticed are:

Abstract deadline               : 31 July 2011

Acceptance                        : 8 August 2011

Full paper                            : 20 August 2011 (to be included in eProceeding)

Seminar                               : 12-13 September 2011

 

Send abstract and paper through geoinfo.ipb@gmail.com. For more information on the Seminar, please found on our website http://ghnrm.wordpress.comand leaflet attached (note: the schedule on the leaflet has been changed with above information). For further information, do not hesitate to contact the secretariat (contact person: F.S. Putri Cantika or Uthie on +62-8567174888)

2ND INTERNATIONAL YOUNG PLANNERS FORUM 2011

2ND INTERNATIONAL YOUNG PLANNERS FORUM 2011

“END OF CITIES

YOGJAKARTA, INDONESIA

13th – 15th July 2011 


PROGRAM OVERVIEW

 

BACKGROUND

The International Young Planners Forum (IYPF), first established in 2010 at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, is a firum that promotes knowledge sharing, intense discussions and network development among young planners trouhgout Asia – Pacific. The IYPF emphasizes the importance of building common ground of understanding, developing mutual relations among young planners troughout Asia – Pacific and stimulating regeneration of planners. The creation of IYPF was intended to nurture and to guide young planners, particularly in the Asia – Pacific region, to be able to comprehend planning and development issues in the region and to provide alternate solutions for those issues. Given that countries of the Asia – Pacific region have similarities in many ways; the IYPF belives that the region shall overcome future challenges by working together.

 

The International Young Planners Forum (IYPF) 2011 will be held in Yogyakarta, Indonesia on July 13-15, 2011. The theme for the 2nd IYPF is The End of Cities.

 

VISION

  1. Enhancing young planners to have a global view
  2. Developing mutual relations among young planners troughout Asia – Pacific
  3. Creating partnerships with governments, private institutions, NGOs and other international and local communities
  4. Providing alternative solutions to overcome planning and development issues

 

GOALS

IYPF is an inclusive event. We welcome all stakeholders to participate and take active part in this event. The Goals for IYPF 2011 are :

  1. Renew the IYPF Declaration
  2. Establish a forum which gathers young planners from Asia Pacific countries

 

THEME

The main theme for the 2nd International Young Planners Forum is “The End of Cities”. These are three subtheme that supports the main theme :

  1. Identifying Planning Systems in each members countries
  2. The concept of Future Cities
  3. Roadmap of the Future Cities

 

SPEAKERS :

  1. H.E. Ir. Djoko Kirmanto, Dipl.HE (Minister of Public Works, Republic of Indonesia)*
  2. H.E. H. Suharso Manoarfa (Minister of Public Housing, Republic of Indonesia)*
  3. H.E. Sri Sultan Hamengkubuwono X (Governor of DI Yogyakarta)*
  4. Ir. Imam S. Ernawi, MCM (Director General of Spatial Planning, Ministry of Public Works)
  5. Ir. Bernardus Djonoputro (Secretary General of IAP)
  6. Noorliza Hasyim (Past Presiden of MIP)
  7. Delik Hudalah, PhD (Young Planner Indonesia)
  8. Mazrina Khalid, BA, MBA (Young Planner Malaysia)
  9. Sebastian Tauni, BA (Young Planner NSW-Australia)
  10. Jessica Noonan, BA (Young Planner Victoria-Australia)
  11. Christopher O’Connor, BA (Young Planner Western Australia)
  12. Singapore Young Planners

 

VENUE

The 2nd International Young Planners Forum 2011 will be held in :

Date : 13 – 15 July 2011

Place : Phoenix Hotel, Jl.Jend Sudirman No. 9, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

 

ACTIVITIES

  1. Conference

Day/Date : Wednesday – Thursday, July 13 – 14, 2011

Time    : 08.00 am – 04.00 pm

Venue : Phoenix Hotel, Jl. Jend.Sudirman 9, Yogyakarta

 

  1. Site Visit

Visited some areas around Yogyakarta that presents the heritage and cultural preservation, riverfront revitalization area, and also local creative community and disaster mitigation area.

 

Day/Date : Friday, July 15 th 2011

Time : 08.45 am – finish

Venue : Borobudur Temple, Prambanan Temple, Kali Code, Keraton Yogyakarta and Tamansari, Silver Craft Area, Merapi Site, Sukunan Village.

 

  1. Golf Session

It is an alternative event for conference participants. This event aims to develop networks by accommodate the discussion with golf session. All expenses are not included in the conference package.

 

Day/Date : Friday, July 15th 2011

Time : 08.45 – Finish

Venue : Merapi Golf, Golf Top of Jogja, Jl. Golf No.1 Kepuhan – Cangkringan , Kab. Sleman, Yogyakarta 55281.

 

DETAIL PROGRAM

Wednesday  13th July 2011

8.00 am

Forum Registration

8.30 am

Arrival of Guests

9.00 am

WELCOME ADDRESS

By Ir. Iman Soedradjat MPM, President of IAP

9.10 am

Keynote Address – How to cope with infrastructure demands derived by market in the city

By Indonesian Minister of Public Works*

9.30 am

Keynote Addres – Housing Development to Accelerate Urban Growth

By Indonesian Minister of Public Housing*

9.50 am

Keynote Addres – Beetwen heritage preservation and modernization

By Governor of DI Yogyakarta, Sri Sultan Hamengkubuwono X*

10.10 am

Soft Launching World Town Planning Day 2011

Director General of Spatial Planning

10.20 am

Morning Coffee Break

 

TOPIC : Do We Have The Right Planning System To Address Planning Challenge Today?

10.30 am

Malaysian Planning System By MIP

10.50 am

Singapore Planning System By SIP

11.10 am

Australia Planning System By PIA

11.30 am

Indonesia Planning System By IAP

11.50 am

World Café 1 (discussion session)

Moderated By Ir Bernardus R. Djonoputro  (Sec. Gen of IAP)

12.30 am

Lunch Break

 

TOPIC : What Do We Want Our Future Cities To Be?

2.00 pm

Compact Cities vs Sprawling Cities: Australian Way by PIA

2.20 pm

Sustainable Urban Development : Is it merely a concept ? by IAP

2.40 pm

Is Smart Growth the solution for the Future? by MIP

3.00 pm

Living Cities of Singapore by SIP YP

3.20 pm

World Café 2 (discussion session)

Moderated By Norliza Hashim (Past President of MIP)

4.00 pm

End of Day 1 (Video Screening)

7.00 pm

Dinners Dialogue (invitation only)*

With H.E Sri Sultan Hamengkubuwono X and Director General of Spatial Planning

Thursday 14th July 2011

8.30am

Registration

 

TOPIC : Road Maps To Cities Of The Future

9.00 am

Melbourne @ 5 Million By PIA

9.30 am

Managing Kuala Lumpur’s Growth towards World Class Sustainable Cities By MIP

10.00 am

Morning Coffee Break

10.30 am

The Real Challenge of Indonesian Cities: Managing Mega Urban Region, Case Jabodetabekjur By IAP

11.00 am

Livable Cities: The Case of Singapore By SIP

11.30 am

World Café 3 Moderated By tbc

12.30 pm

Lunch Break

2.00 pm

RENEW THE VOW OF YPF 2010 DECLARATION & SIGNING THE MoU

3.00 pm

Presentation of Tomorrow’s Site Visit (Video Screening)

3.30 pm

End of Day Two
FRIDAY 15th July 2011

8.00 am

Pre-Departure Briefing
8.30 am – SITE VISIT (optional, the charge for each tour is US$ 25/ Rp 200.000 per pax)

TOUR A

TOUR B

TOUR C

Preservation area :

1.    Borobudur temple (UNESCO World Heritage Site)

2.    Prambanan temple

Riverfront revitalization & Cultural heritage :

1.    Kali Code

2.    Keraton Yogyakarta

3.    Taman Sari

Local economics & disaster mitigation :

1.    Silver craft

2.    Merapi site

3.    Sukunan Village

GOLF SESSION (OPTIONAL)
NOTE :

  1. Each tour limited to 1 bus
  2. Capacity of 1 bus = 40 pax


PROSPECTED PARTICIPANTS

We are inviting all planners and other related professionals from various countries troughout Asia – Pacific to participate in this event. There are at least (but not limited to) eight countries that we are targeting to participate, they are : Indonesia, Malaysia, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Thailand, Philipines and Brunei Darussalam.

 

ACCOMODATION

Participants aren’t provided with accommodation, but the committee will help the reservation for the hotel as stated bellow:

1.    Phoenix Hotel, at Jl Sudirman. Room Price IDR 900,000

2.    Hotel Santika, Yogyakarta. Room price: IDR 700,000

3.    Hotel INA Garuda, at Jalan Malioboro. Room price : IDR 700.000

4.    Hotel Novotel, at Jalan Jalan Jend.Sudirman. Room price : IDR 800.000

5.    Other Hotel as requested.

 

FEES

The individual registration rates to be participated in this event can be seen as follow :

§  Students                                                     : USD 35 / IDR 300.000

§  IAP, MIP, PIA                                              : USD 75 / IDR 650.000

§  General public (Indonesian participant)           : US 100 / IDR 850.000

§  General public (international participant)         : US 125/ IDR 1.000.000

§  Technical Tour                                             : USD 25 / IDR 200.000

§  Golf Session                                                : USD 250/ IDR 2.000.000 

 

REGISTRATION

Registration form can be downloaded at IAP website :

http://www.iap.or.id/_data/_download/IYPForm.xls

submit the form to : reg.iypf@gmail.com

 

Payment can be transferred to IAP account :

Ikatan Ahli Perencanaan

Bank Mandiri KC Tebet, Jakarta Selatan

Account No : 124-00-9503201-8

 

For further information contact :

  1. Inggit Nursusanto : +622196617273
  2. Remy : +6281388220088

Email : info.iypf@gmail.com
Presented by : IAP, MIP & EAROPH CLUB INDONESIA

2ND INTERNATIONAL YOUNG PLANNERS FORUM 2011

“END OF CITIES

YOGJAKARTA, INDONESIA

13th – 15th July 2011 


PROGRAM OVERVIEW

 

BACKGROUND

The International Young Planners Forum (IYPF), first established in 2010 at Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, is a firum that promotes knowledge sharing, intense discussions and network development among young planners trouhgout Asia – Pacific. The IYPF emphasizes the importance of building common ground of understanding, developing mutual relations among young planners troughout Asia – Pacific and stimulating regeneration of planners. The creation of IYPF was intended to nurture and to guide young planners, particularly in the Asia – Pacific region, to be able to comprehend planning and development issues in the region and to provide alternate solutions for those issues. Given that countries of the Asia – Pacific region have similarities in many ways; the IYPF belives that the region shall overcome future challenges by working together.

 

The International Young Planners Forum (IYPF) 2011 will be held in Yogyakarta, Indonesia on July 13-15, 2011. The theme for the 2nd IYPF is The End of Cities.

 

VISION

  1. Enhancing young planners to have a global view
  2. Developing mutual relations among young planners troughout Asia – Pacific
  3. Creating partnerships with governments, private institutions, NGOs and other international and local communities
  4. Providing alternative solutions to overcome planning and development issues

 

GOALS

IYPF is an inclusive event. We welcome all stakeholders to participate and take active part in this event. The Goals for IYPF 2011 are :

  1. Renew the IYPF Declaration
  2. Establish a forum which gathers young planners from Asia Pacific countries

 

THEME

The main theme for the 2nd International Young Planners Forum is “The End of Cities”. These are three subtheme that supports the main theme :

  1. Identifying Planning Systems in each members countries
  2. The concept of Future Cities
  3. Roadmap of the Future Cities

 

SPEAKERS :

  1. H.E. Ir. Djoko Kirmanto, Dipl.HE (Minister of Public Works, Republic of Indonesia)*
  2. H.E. H. Suharso Manoarfa (Minister of Public Housing, Republic of Indonesia)*
  3. H.E. Sri Sultan Hamengkubuwono X (Governor of DI Yogyakarta)*
  4. Ir. Imam S. Ernawi, MCM (Director General of Spatial Planning, Ministry of Public Works)
  5. Ir. Bernardus Djonoputro (Secretary General of IAP)
  6. Noorliza Hasyim (Past Presiden of MIP)
  7. Delik Hudalah, PhD (Young Planner Indonesia)
  8. Mazrina Khalid, BA, MBA (Young Planner Malaysia)
  9. Sebastian Tauni, BA (Young Planner NSW-Australia)
  10. Jessica Noonan, BA (Young Planner Victoria-Australia)
  11. Christopher O’Connor, BA (Young Planner Western Australia)
  12. Singapore Young Planners

 

VENUE

The 2nd International Young Planners Forum 2011 will be held in :

Date : 13 – 15 July 2011

Place : Phoenix Hotel, Jl.Jend Sudirman No. 9, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

 

ACTIVITIES

  1. Conference

Day/Date : Wednesday – Thursday, July 13 – 14, 2011

Time    : 08.00 am – 04.00 pm

Venue : Phoenix Hotel, Jl. Jend.Sudirman 9, Yogyakarta

 

  1. Site Visit

Visited some areas around Yogyakarta that presents the heritage and cultural preservation, riverfront revitalization area, and also local creative community and disaster mitigation area.

 

Day/Date : Friday, July 15 th 2011

Time : 08.45 am – finish

Venue : Borobudur Temple, Prambanan Temple, Kali Code, Keraton Yogyakarta and Tamansari, Silver Craft Area, Merapi Site, Sukunan Village.

 

  1. Golf Session

It is an alternative event for conference participants. This event aims to develop networks by accommodate the discussion with golf session. All expenses are not included in the conference package.

 

Day/Date : Friday, July 15th 2011

Time : 08.45 – Finish

Venue : Merapi Golf, Golf Top of Jogja, Jl. Golf No.1 Kepuhan – Cangkringan , Kab. Sleman, Yogyakarta 55281.

 

DETAIL PROGRAM

Wednesday  13th July 2011

8.00 am

Forum Registration

8.30 am

Arrival of Guests

9.00 am

WELCOME ADDRESS

By Ir. Iman Soedradjat MPM, President of IAP

9.10 am

Keynote Address – How to cope with infrastructure demands derived by market in the city

By Indonesian Minister of Public Works*

9.30 am

Keynote Addres – Housing Development to Accelerate Urban Growth

By Indonesian Minister of Public Housing*

9.50 am

Keynote Addres – Beetwen heritage preservation and modernization

By Governor of DI Yogyakarta, Sri Sultan Hamengkubuwono X*

10.10 am

Soft Launching World Town Planning Day 2011

Director General of Spatial Planning

10.20 am

Morning Coffee Break

 

TOPIC : Do We Have The Right Planning System To Address Planning Challenge Today?

10.30 am

Malaysian Planning System By MIP

10.50 am

Singapore Planning System By SIP

11.10 am

Australia Planning System By PIA

11.30 am

Indonesia Planning System By IAP

11.50 am

World Café 1 (discussion session)

Moderated By Ir Bernardus R. Djonoputro  (Sec. Gen of IAP)

12.30 am

Lunch Break

 

TOPIC : What Do We Want Our Future Cities To Be?

2.00 pm

Compact Cities vs Sprawling Cities: Australian Way by PIA

2.20 pm

Sustainable Urban Development : Is it merely a concept ? by IAP

2.40 pm

Is Smart Growth the solution for the Future? by MIP

3.00 pm

Living Cities of Singapore by SIP YP

3.20 pm

World Café 2 (discussion session)

Moderated By Norliza Hashim (Past President of MIP)

4.00 pm

End of Day 1 (Video Screening)

7.00 pm

Dinners Dialogue (invitation only)*

With H.E Sri Sultan Hamengkubuwono X and Director General of Spatial Planning

Thursday 14th July 2011

8.30am

Registration

 

TOPIC : Road Maps To Cities Of The Future

9.00 am

Melbourne @ 5 Million By PIA

9.30 am

Managing Kuala Lumpur’s Growth towards World Class Sustainable Cities By MIP

10.00 am

Morning Coffee Break

10.30 am

The Real Challenge of Indonesian Cities: Managing Mega Urban Region, Case Jabodetabekjur By IAP

11.00 am

Livable Cities: The Case of Singapore By SIP

11.30 am

World Café 3 Moderated By tbc

12.30 pm

Lunch Break

2.00 pm

RENEW THE VOW OF YPF 2010 DECLARATION & SIGNING THE MoU

3.00 pm

Presentation of Tomorrow’s Site Visit (Video Screening)

3.30 pm

End of Day Two
FRIDAY 15th July 2011

8.00 am

Pre-Departure Briefing
8.30 am – SITE VISIT (optional, the charge for each tour is US$ 25/ Rp 200.000 per pax)

TOUR A

TOUR B

TOUR C

Preservation area :

1.    Borobudur temple (UNESCO World Heritage Site)

2.    Prambanan temple

Riverfront revitalization & Cultural heritage :

1.    Kali Code

2.    Keraton Yogyakarta

3.    Taman Sari

Local economics & disaster mitigation :

1.    Silver craft

2.    Merapi site

3.    Sukunan Village

GOLF SESSION (OPTIONAL)
NOTE :

  1. Each tour limited to 1 bus
  2. Capacity of 1 bus = 40 pax


PROSPECTED PARTICIPANTS

We are inviting all planners and other related professionals from various countries troughout Asia – Pacific to participate in this event. There are at least (but not limited to) eight countries that we are targeting to participate, they are : Indonesia, Malaysia, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Thailand, Philipines and Brunei Darussalam.

 

ACCOMODATION

Participants aren’t provided with accommodation, but the committee will help the reservation for the hotel as stated bellow:

1.    Phoenix Hotel, at Jl Sudirman. Room Price IDR 900,000

2.    Hotel Santika, Yogyakarta. Room price: IDR 700,000

3.    Hotel INA Garuda, at Jalan Malioboro. Room price : IDR 700.000

4.    Hotel Novotel, at Jalan Jalan Jend.Sudirman. Room price : IDR 800.000

5.    Other Hotel as requested.

 

FEES

The individual registration rates to be participated in this event can be seen as follow :

§  Students                                                     : USD 35 / IDR 300.000

§  IAP, MIP, PIA                                              : USD 75 / IDR 650.000

§  General public (Indonesian participant)           : US 100 / IDR 850.000

§  General public (international participant)         : US 125/ IDR 1.000.000

§  Technical Tour                                             : USD 25 / IDR 200.000

§  Golf Session                                                : USD 250/ IDR 2.000.000 

 

REGISTRATION

Registration form can be downloaded at IAP website :

http://www.iap.or.id/_data/_download/IYPForm.xls

submit the form to : reg.iypf@gmail.com

 

Payment can be transferred to IAP account :

Ikatan Ahli Perencanaan

Bank Mandiri KC Tebet, Jakarta Selatan

Account No : 124-00-9503201-8

 

For further information contact :

  1. Inggit Nursusanto : +622196617273
  2. Remy : +6281388220088

Email : info.iypf@gmail.com
Presented by : IAP, MIP & EAROPH CLUB INDONESIA

“Kondisi Kota Besar di Indonesia Mengkhawatirkan”

Kondisi Kota Besar di Indonesia Mengkhawatirkan

Jakarta, 26 Mei 2011 – Survey Most Livable City Index 2011 menunjukkan bahwa kondisi kota – kota besar di Indonesia berada dalam kondisi yang mengkhawatirkan.

Dalam press releas yang diselenggarakan pada hari Kamis, 26 Mei 2011, Sekjen IAP, Ir. Bernardus Djonoputro, mengatakan bahwa mayoritas kondisi kota-kota besar di Indonesia dinilai tidak nyaman oleh warganya.
Berdasarkan survey yang dilakukan di 15 kota besar, diketahui bahwa nilai rata-rata (mean) indeks kenyamanan kota adalah 54,26. Indeks dengan persepsi tingkat kenyamanan tertinggi di Kota Yogyakarta (66,52) dan Kota Denpasar (63.63). Sedangkan  dan persepsi kenyamanan warga yang paling rendah adalah Kota Medan (46,67) dan Kota Pontianak (46.92).
Kota – kota dengan indeks diatas rata–rata adalah : Yogyakarta, Denpasar, Makassar, Menado, Surabaya dan Semarang.  Sedangkan kota – kota dengan indeks dibawah rata-rata adalah Banjarmasin, Batam, Jayapura, Bandung, Palembang, Palangkaraya, Jakarta, Pontianak dan Medan.

Kota Jakarta, sebagai Ibukota negara dirasakan semakin tidak nyaman terutama dalam aspek tata kota, kualitas lingkungan dan transportasi yang buruk.

Berikut adalah indeks persepsi kenyamanan untuk setiap kota :

KOTA

MLCI 2009

MLCI 2011

  Yogyakarta

65,34

66.52

  Denpasar

63.63

  Makasar

56,52

58.46

  Manado

59,90

56.39

  Surabaya

53,13

56.38

  Semarang

52,52

54.63

  Banjarmasin

52,61

53.16

  Batam

52.60

  Jayapura

53,86

52.56

  Bandung

56,37

52.32

  Palembang

52.15

  Palangkaraya

52,04

50.86

  Jakarta

51,90

50.71

  Pontianak

43,65

46.92

  Medan

52,28

46.67

Dibandingkan dengan index MLCI pada tahun 2009, ada beberapa kota yang mengalami kenaikan yaitu : Yogyakarta, Makassar, Surabaya, Semarang, Banjarmasin dan Pontianak. Sedangkan kota Menado, Jayapura, Bandung, Palangkaraya, Jakarta dan Medan mengalami penurunan.

Berdasarkan survey terhadap persepsi masyarakat yang telah dilakukan diketahui beberapa temuan yang cukup menarik, diantaranya adalah :

1. Kota Paling Nyaman

Kota dengan persepsi warga paling nyaman adalah Kota Yogyakarta dengan indeks 66,52%. Hampir pada semua kriteria, persepsi warga Kota Yogyakarta selalu diatas 30 %, kecuali untuk kriteria ketersediaan lapangan kerja (29%). Budaya masyarakat Kota Yogya yang lembut, sopan, ramah, penurut dan tidak banyak menuntut merupakan salah satu alasan tingginya persepsi kenyamanan warga terhadap kotanya selain tentu saja pencapaian pembangunan kota yang telah dilakukan pemerintah bersama dengan warga kota Yogya.

Kota lainnya yang dianggap cukup nyaman oleh warganya adalah Kota Denpasar dengan indeks 63.63. Sebagai kota pariwisata, Denpasar dirasakan cukup nyaman oleh warganya kecuali untuk variabel tingkat pencemaran lingkungan, dimana warga kota merasakan adanya pencemaran lingkungan yang cukup tinggi.

2. Kota Paling Tidak Nyaman

Kota Medan dan Kota Pontianak memiliki persepsi kenyamanan warga yang rendah hampir pada semua kriteria.

Kota Medan dipersepsikan warganya memiliki kondisi tata kota dan kualitas lingkungan yang buruk, kualitas pedestrian yang buruk, perlindungan bangunan bersejarah yang buruk dan tingginya tingkat kriminalitas kota. Nampaknya perkembangan Kota Medan yang cukup pesat tidak diimbangi dengan penataan kota yang baik dan perlindungan terhadap bangunan bersejarah di kota tersebut.

Kota Pontianak dipersepsikan warganya memiliki tata kota yang buruk, biaya hidup yang tinggi, kesempatan kerja yang rendah, kualitas air bersih yang kurang. Dari aspek fisik dapat dilihat bahwa Kota Pontianak memiliki lahan gambut yang sangat luas, hal ini berdampak pada keterbatasan areal pengembangan kota, limitasi bagi pengembangan infrastruktur dan ketersediaan air bersih.
3. Kriteria Penataan Kota

Untuk Kriteria Penataan Kota, Kota Palangkaraya memiliki angka prosentase tertinggi dipersepsikan oleh warganya memiliki penataan kota yang baik, yaitu sebanyak 60 %. Kota Palangkaraya meskipun masih jauh dari ukuran ideal, namun memiliki kondisi penataan kota yang cukup baik. Jaringan jalan yang lebar dengan pengaturan bangunan yang baik menjadikan struktur kota yang rapid dan teratur. Akomodasi ruang Kota Palangkaraya terhadap pertumbuhan penduduk dinilai masih memadai.

Hal yang sebaliknya terjadi dengan Kota Bandung dan Kota Medan. Kota dengan persepsi terendah untuk aspek tata kota adalah Kota Bandung yaitu hanya 3 % dan Kota Medan yaitu 5%. Hal ini artinya bahwa hanya 3 % responden warga Kota Bandung dan 5% warga Kota Medan yang menganggap kualitas penataan kotanya baik, selebihnya 95-97 % menganggap aspek penataan Kota Medan dan Kota Bandung adalah buruk.

Angka 3 % ini merupakan angka terendah dari semua kriteria di semua kota, dan itu ada di Kota Bandung. Hal ini mengindikasikan bahwa warga Kota Bandung sangat tidak puas dengan kondisi penataan kota Bandung sekarang. Salah satu hal yang dapat dilihat secara kasat mata adalah indikasi komersialisasi kota yang bergerak terlalu jauh yang merampas ruang-ruang publik yang tentu hal ini dinilai tidak baik oleh masyarakat kota.

Tentu saja indikasi ini harus menjadi perhatian bagi semua stakeholder pembangunan Kota Bandung, baik pihak pemerintah, swasta, akademisi, praktisi dan pihak masyarakat dan swasta untuk ikut mengawal kondisi Tata Kota Bandung menuju penataan kota yang lebih baik.
Pada dasarnya, kepentingan umum seperti perasaan keteraturan, kenyamanan dan keamanan dapat terwujud dengan penataan yang terarah, teratur dan berkualitas. Sehingga dengan demikian kriteria penataan kota ini berdampak besar terhadap aspek kehidupan perkotaan lainnya.
4. Kriteria Ketersediaan Lapangan Kerja.

Untuk kriteria ini warga Kota Palembang dan Kota Medan memiliki persepsi yang paling rendah, yaitu hanya 16 & 17 %. Sedangkan Kota Batam dipersepsikan warganya sebagai kota dengan kesempatan lapangan kerja yang tinggi yaitu 75%.

5. Angkutan Umum

Ketersediaan angkutan umum dipersepsikan cukup baik oleh warga kota, yaitu rata-rata pada index 60.4%. Ketersediaan berbagai moda angkutan umum mulai dari bis kota dan angkutan kota yang cukup banyak. Tetapi kualitas dari angkutan umum dirasakan rendah dengan index 38,67%, hal ini menunjukkan tingkat pelayanan dari angkutan umum tersebut masih rendah.

Untuk itu diperlukan adanya pengembangan sistem angkutan umum masal disetiap kota, terutama untuk kota Medan, Jakarta, Bandung, Semarang dan Surabaya.
6. Fasilitas untuk kaum Difabel

Semua kota belum memberikan fasilitas yang memadai bagi penyandang cacat. Buruknya fasilitasi bagi penyandang cacat ini dapat diartikan pula bahwa semua kota belum memiliki fasilitasi yang baik bagi kaum manula dan ibu hamil, padahal mereka semua juga merupakan warga kota yang harus diperhatikan.
Pada dasarnya kenyamanan hidup berkota adalah hak setiap warga kota, maka pemerintah kota sebagai pihak yang diberi mandate oleh warga harus berusaha untuk merencanakan, membangun dan mengendalikan kawasan perkotaan demi terciptanya lingkungan perkotaan yang nyaman untuk dihuni. Begitupun pihak warga harus paham, mengerti dan menjalankan kewajiban sebagai warga kota yang baik, tidak sekedar menjadi masyarakat kota saja tetapi benar-benar menjadi warga kota (citizen) yang turut mewujudkan kenyamanan kota.

Sekjen IAP, Bernardus Djonoputro, mengungkapkan bahwa indeks ini merupakan “Snapshot” yang Simple dan Aktual mengenai persepsi warga kota menunjukan bahwa kota-kota besar Indonesia saat ini masih jauh dari kondisi yang ideal sebagai kota yang nyaman. Kondisi ini akan semakin tidak nyaman apabila tidak ada tindakan berani, kreatif dan progressif dari para pemimpin kota, terutama walikota, untuk mengambil dan menerapkan kebijakan pembangunan kota yang berani.

“Masa depan perkotaan Indonesia akan menghadapi tantangan yang semakin besar, otonomi daerah dan desentralisasi pembangunan akan membawa pada pertumbuhan kota-kota baru. Pemimpin kota harus memiliki visi, leadership dan dukungan warga kota untuk mewujudkan Kota Masa Depan Indonesia yang Livable” demikian ujar Bernardus.

Tentang IAP

Ikatan Ahli Perencanan Indonesia (disingkat IAP) adalah satu-satu nya organisasi profesi Perencana Kota dan Wilayah, didirikan di Jakarta 13 April 1971 di Jakarta.

IAP memiliki 24 cabang yang tersebar di 24 provinsi dan 1,200 perencana yang bersertifikat ari total 3000 anggota. Saat ini IAP adalah asosiasi profesi perencana kota dan wilayah dengan anggota yang paling besar di kawasan Asia Pasific

IAP memilki BAdan Sertifikasi Perencana secara berkala menyelenggarakan sertifikasi bagi perencana yang diakui oleh LPJKN (Lembaga Pengembangan Jasa Konstruksi Nasional) dan BNSP (Badan Nasional Sertifikasi Profesi).

Website : www.iap.or.id

 

Kontak:

Bernardus R. Djonoputro

Sekretaris Jenderal

Ikatan Ahli Perencanaan Indonesia (IAP)

Tel: +62-21-521 4337/8, HP: +62-818 736 447

Email: bernardus.djonoputro@hdaadvisory.com

Dhani Muttaqin

Direktur Eksekutif

Ikatan Ahli Perencanaan Indonseia (IAP)

Tel : 082112658050

Email : direksec_iap@yahoo.com

Jakarta Berkebun

Jakarta Berkebun @ Springhill

Ingin Jakarta yang lebih hijau? Mencari kegiatan baru yang fun bersama teman dan keluarga saat weekend?
Ada lahan kosong yang tidak di manfaatkan?

Be part of our movement!

Jakarta Berkebun adalah pilot project kita semua untuk menciptakan lahan hijau di tengah kota yang juga memberikan manfaat bagi komunitas sekitar. Mari ikut menanam sayuran dan buah-buahan, berkebun, dan panen bersama teman-teman dan keluarga.

Minggu, 20 Februari 2011 @ 3 pm
di Springhill Golf Residence, Kemayoran
GRATIS!
*peta terlampir dibawah

*mohon mengenakan pakaian yang ringan, sendal jepit / sepatu boot, dan sarung tangan berkebun

Lokasi di Kemayoran ini merupakan pilot project yang akan diterapkan di berbagai pelosok Jakarta, dan di kota-kota besar lainnya yang akan kita mulai dari lingkungan rumah kamu atau tanah “kosong” lain yang tidak difungsikan.

Untuk bergabung daftar di website kita http://indonesiaberkebun.org,
follow us @JktBerkebun on twitter.com

Sponsored by: Springhill Golf Residence & The Royale Springhill Residence
Media Partner: MetroTV, GlobalTV, Kompas, Tabloid Rumah, Radio BBC Indonesia


Pemerintah Dinilai Plin Plan Soal Tata Ruang

http://www.investor.co.id/home/pemerintah-dinilai-plin-plan-soal-tata-ruang/5018

Minggu, 6 Februari 2011 | 21:55
JAKARTA – Pemerintah dinilai tidak punya visi dan prioritas yang jelas serta tidak tegas atau plin plan terkait dengan persoalan lambannya pemerintah pusat, provinsi dan kabupaten/kota untuk menyiapkan Peraturan Daerah Rencana Tata Ruang Wilayah (RTRW) dalam satu atau dua tahun terakhir.

“Kalau rencana pembuatan sembilan Perpres (Peraturan Presiden) tentang RTRW kawasan strategis nasional dan perbatasan, itu benar, maka akan terjadi tumpang tindih dengan proses pembuatan peraturan daerah RTRW yang saat ini sedang berjalan. Inilah ciri khas pemerintah yang plin-plan,” kata Sekjen Ikatan Ahli Perencanaan (IAP), Bernardus Djonoputro saat dihubungi di Jakarta, Minggu.

Penegasan tersebut terkait dengan rencana pemerintah dalam dua pekan sejak akhir Januari 2011 yang akan membuat sembilan Perpres tentang RTRW kawasan strategis nasional dan perbatasan untuk menunjang percepatan investasi di daerah.

Menurut dia, mestinya prioritas pemerintah sesuai dengan semangat UU No 26 Tahun 2007 tentang Penataan Ruang dan fokus menyelesaikan Peraturan Daerah tentang RTRW di seluruh Provinsi dan Kabupaten/Kota secepatnya agar kepastian dan legalitas tata ruang segera tercipta sehingga rencana investasi, infrastruktur dan lain sebagainya menjadi jelas.

“Dengan fakta bahwa baru ada tujuh Provinsi dan 18 kabupaten/kota yang memiliki Perda Tata Ruang, ini sebenarnya sudah darurat tata ruang dan bukti bahwa hasil nyata ketidakmampuan Dirjen Penataan Ruang Kementerian Pekerjaan Umum dalam memberikan bantuan teknis ke Pemda dan DPRD Provinsi dan Kabupaten/Kota,” katanya.

Ia mempertanyakan kondisi tersebut karena sebetulnya pemerintah sudah menyediakan anggaran untuk itu.

Ia juga menduga, faktor lambannya bantuan teknis tersebut karena diakibatkan oleh kendala utama selama ini yakni sulitnya koordinasi antara pemerintah pusat, daerah dan antar kementerian.

“Oleh karena itu, kami mendesak agar pemerintah berani menyatakan bahwa saat ini sedang terjadi darurat tata ruang dan inilah sumber dari pemicu terhambatnya pertumbuhan ekonomi dan investasi di daerah,” katanya.

Hal itu perlu, sebab, lanjutnya, akan percuma dan sia-sia pihak lain mengajak investor datang ke suatu wilayah, jika pemanfaatan tata ruang di daerah itu tidak mempunyai legalitas.

“Andai saya ingin mendirikan pabrik di suatu kota di Indonesia, tentu akan berpikir dua kali karena pertama, belum tentu perutukan ruang pabrik sesuai dengan RTRW, dan kedua, jika terlanjur berdiri dan ternyata tidak sesuai RTW, itu sama dengan investor bunuh diri,” katanya.

Jadi, tegasnya, tiadanya perda RTRW itu adalah salah satu penghambat investasi karena seluruh izin investasi di daerah akan ditangguhkan karena perda zonasi sebagai landasan hukum bagi penerbitan izin usaha belum dapat dikeluarkan.

IAP dengan anggota yang tersebar di 23 provinsi di Indonesia, tambahnya, siap memberikan bantuan teknis untuk mempermudah proses pembuatan Perda RTRW di seluruh Provinsi/Kabupaten/Kota di Indonesia. (tk/ant)

Indonesia’s urban development challenges

Tommy Firman, Bandung | Sat, 02/05/2011 12:50 PM | http://www.thejakartapost.com

According to the 2010 census the total population of Indonesia is 237.5 million people, about a half whom, or 118 million people, live in urban areas. This implies that urban development will become a more pressing issue in the country.
Urban development issues should be understood not only in recognizable everyday problems, such as traffic congestion, slums and crime, but also needs to be viewed within the broader context of socio-economic and political dynamics, as well as geographical/physical conditions, at the global, regional, and local levels.
Cities play an important role in the national economy, as more than half of the national Gross Domestic Products is generated from the cities. There are some issues of urban development in this decade which the central and local governments, as well as other stakeholders, have to address.
First, the global economy has greatly affected the development of big cities, such as Jakarta, Surabaya and Medan, which have been integrated into the global urban system in Asia, or even the world, centered in Tokyo and Singapore, New York and London, which is driven by global capital.
Wellerstein coined the term “World Capitalist System”, which divides the world into three major categories: The Center, Semi-Periphery, and Periphery. Cities could also be divided into these categories due to the advancement of information and transportation technology, which no longer imposes geographic boundaries on the flow of people, goods, capital and information.
Moreover, the development of industrial production technologies has paved the way for production of components in various locations to be finally assembled in a particular location. In turn, it has created efficient division of work and labor.
Central to this division of work is competitiveness of the cities which is a function of the availability of infrastructure, facilities and amenities and the level of livability. Those in the periphery can actually improve the status to the category of semi-periphery if they can improve the level of competitiveness.
However, many urban experts argue that the large cities in developing countries only serve the global capitalist system, with very weak linkages to the national economy.
Second, from a national perspective, urban development of cities in Indonesia also reflects regional disparities. Urbanization and development of urban economic activities are still heavily concentrated in big cities, particularly Greater Jakarta, Surabaya and its buffer cities, and Greater Bandung, while the development of cities outside Java remains slow, with the exception of Medan, Palembang, Makassar and Manado.
The disparities are not surprising because the infrastructure and facilities for the development of economic and business activities are concentrated in large cities.
Issues of national urban development also include urban poverty, rural-urban migration and the informal sector. These problems have been recognized in Indonesia’s explicit urban development policies, such as the National Urban Development Strategy and the National Spatial Plan, but in reality these policies are ineffective because they are not elaborated systematically into more detailed programs and not used as a reference for sectoral development, both at national and regional levels.
On the contrary, even the implicit policies, or sectoral policies that do not have any intention to intervene in the development of the city, in reality has greatly influenced the development of cities and worked very effectively, such as deregulation packages that were launched in the mid-1990s.
Third, climate change will have a significant impact on urban development, including floods due to abnormal rainfall, and floods from rising sea levels that occur more frequent on the north coast of Java for instance. The impact of this in turn can cause severe damage to infrastructure, human settlements, and adversely affect the urban and national economic activity. It is imperative to conduct necessary mitigation, i.e. physical control over these impacts, and adaptation efforts.
Fourth, in a broader environmental context, the issue of urban development is sustainability.
Environmental problems facing major cities and medium and even small towns include ineffectiveness and inefficiency in water resources utilization, massive and uncontrolled land conversion, land subsidence due to heavy building construction and uncontrolled underground water pumping, solid waste and liquid waste management which is beyond the ability of most city and district governments and inadequate green open spaces.
The pattern of ribbon development (sprawl) in urban areas has resulted in traffic congestion along the main arterial roads as well as a longer vehicle trip, which could emit more gas.
Fifth, the urban development has to deal with the inadequate infrastructure and urban facilities.
Meanwhile, development of new towns, luxury apartments and super malls is increasingly sharpening the dualistic socio-economic conditions in the cities, which in turn will lead to segmentation of urban space. Another problem to address is violations of urban spatial planning for development of these activities for several reasons, including an increase in regional revenue.
Sixth, the spatial planning law requires that the planning, utilization and control of urban space involve all stakeholders in the process, by applying the principle of efficiency and effectiveness, transparency and accountability, which are principles of good governance. This will be a new exercise for most of the local governments. There is also a need to enhance the capacity of the city government to improve the provision of public services and to deal with poverty.
Seventh, in the euphoria of political reform many city and district governments suffer from the syndrome of “regional egoism”. This includes inward looking, in which they do not see the city as part of the wider region. Such a narrow viewpoint would be a constraint for urban development.
Today the need for the presence of inter-city cooperation for development purposes is even more pressing, while their experience remains very limited. There is an urgent need for good transformative leaders who can translate their broad vision into applicable development programs. Fortunately, there are only a few regional heads with such qualities.

The writer is a professor at the Bandung Institute of Technology

Greater Jakarta but failed local autonomy

Darmaningtyas, Jakarta | Sat, 02/05/2011 1:04 PM | http://www.thejakartapost.com/paper
The idea of expanding Greater Jakarta has been proposed as a way for Jakarta to solve its problems of flooding, traffic congestion, poverty and the general decrease in the city’s quality of life.
The concept manifests a concern that the infrastructure needed to create comfortable living conditions in the city is no longer sufficient. This is particularly valid when one looks at the growth of Jakarta’s population and the mobility of people who live around the city in Greater Jakarta, which is comprised of Jakarta, Bogor, Depok, Tangerang and Bekasi. It is difficult to imagine a Jakarta that is free of traffic congestion, fires, poverty or annual floods.
Some alternative schemes have been offered as viable solutions to these problems.
The first scheme is to relocate the capital off of Java. Jakarta would become a commercial city only; government affairs would be conducted in the new capital. This might be a way to distribute resources to other areas.
The second scheme calls for the center of government to be relocated to an area near Jakarta, such as Jonggol, Sentul, Kerawang or Banten.
The third scheme calls for the capital to remain in Jakarta with significant reorganization, including expanding the city to include the Greater Jakarta area. People assume that by expanding Jakarta it will be relatively easier to organize resources, facilities and systems to solve the city’s problems .
At present, conditions in Jakarta are stagnant or even deteriorating. A proposed reorganization will not be successful if surrounding cities are not also reorganized and integrated with Jakarta.
However, reorganizing Jakarta’s surrounding areas is difficult. Those areas come under different authorities. By expanding Jakarta into Greater Jakarta it is expected that the reorganization would be easier since the entire region would fall under a single Greater Jakarta authority.
At a glance, this proposition is very logical. Yet, it will not solve the problem. It will not even change the configuration of the problem.
It will not change anything. Not one bit. Traffic congestion, floods, fires and poverty will continue to plague Jakarta. Expanding the city to include Greater Jakarta will not be automatically followed by the redistribution of communities or businesses that have always been centered in Jakarta.
What will happen is probably what happened after self-sustaining suburbs appeared. These suburbs were created to lessen the burdens on Jakarta, but their objective was not met. Their function was residential only; residents still maintained their jobs in Jakarta. Eventually, the existence of suburbs simply adds to traffic congestion in and around Jakarta.
The Greater Jakarta concept will not solve the problems of Jakarta if the population and the center of business are not relocated. This relocation, furthermore, will not come cheap and will require substantial investments.
The deterioration of Jakarta does not only reflect a failure of management, but also a failure in the decade-long regional autonomy experiment. It is still fresh in our memory that the implementation of local autonomy at the municipal level was aimed to facilitate administrative matters.
With more authority, it was expected that economic development at the local level would accelerate and eventually would slow the urbanization rate. People would not see a need to go to Jakarta for work because they would be able to find jobs in their own cities.
Unfortunately these expectations did not materialize. Had all administrative matters been resolved at the municipal level, new economic activities would have emerged.
These new productive economic activities would have consequently recruited young fresh graduates.
Local autonomy has failed to promote local development because economic activity has remained centered in Jakarta. Jakarta has remained the national center of money circulation.
Local autonomy has encouraged more locally generated money to be spent in Jakarta. Local administrations and officials were forced to go to Jakarta to lobby decisionmakers for more development funds, which went to high ranking officials, legislators, restaurants, hotels and travel agency owners — at the expense of the people.
Hence, local autonomy did occur in the regions from a political but not economic perspective. I also consider this an anomaly. Usually the circulation of money follows the circulation of politics.
What has happened in Indonesia is the contrary. Political autonomy has not been followed by economic improvement reflected in improved welfare. What has been decentralized is merely the corrupt mentality. This is why Jakarta cannot free itself from its problems
To make matters worse, the money from corruption was spent on shopping malls or invested in apartments or houses. The implementation of local autonomy made Jakarta’s problems more complicated.
In my opinion, the capital does not need to be relocated to solve Jakarta’s constant headaches. What is much more important is to evaluate the implementation of local autonomy.
Regional autonomy must improve public welfare in the regions so that the people do not need to migrate to Jakarta and local officials do not waste money in Jakarta.
Efforts to link solutions to Jakarta’s problems with regional autonomy are not new, but have never materialized. Proposed solutions have always involved high costs, such as would be incurred by relocating the capital city, which will cost hundreds of trillions of rupiah. Policymakers have failed to propose softer and more efficient solutions to the problems.
President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono does not need to set a 2014 deadline for a decision on the relocation of the capital. Instead he should set a target for regional autonomy to improve regional welfare to reduce Jakarta’s growth before 2014.
Greater Jakarta will create new and more complex problems in the future if the welfare of the communities in other regions does not improve.
Therefore if Jakarta is expanded, it will attract new residents from other regions.
The concept of Greater Jakarta needs to be reviewed carefully. It is more appropriate to assess the performance of local autonomy that might development of the nation, rather than relocating or expanding Jakarta, which might exacerbate existing problems.

The writer works for the Institute for Transportation Studies
(Instrans).

IKLH Jakarta Terendah

Minggu, 30 Januari 2011 http://cetak.kompas.com

jakarta, kompas – Menteri Lingkungan Hidup Gusti Muhammad Hatta, Sabtu (29/1), meminta Pemerintah Provinsi DKI Jakarta berbenah. Permintaan dilontarkan karena indeks kualitas lingkungan hidup di Jakarta terendah dibandingkan dengan daerah lain di Indonesia.

”Emisi gas buang kendaraan di Jakarta sangat tinggi, terlebih bila terjadi kemacetan. Dengan demikian, indeks kualitas lingkungan hidup (IKLH) DKI Jakarta lebih rendah dibandingkan daerah lainnya,” kata Gusti seusai acara Penanaman Sejuta Pohon di Kota Tarakan, Kalimantan Timur, Sabtu.

Faktor utama rendahnya IKLH, kata Gusti, adalah penutupan lahan, kualitas air, dan kualitas udara. Akibat rendahnya IKLH Jakarta, ia meminta Pemprov DKI Jakarta membenahi sistem transportasi.

Kepala Badan Pengendalian Lingkungan Hidup Daerah (BPLHD) DKI Jakarta Peni Susanti mengatakan, IKLH Jakarta rendah karena banyak indikator penilaian yang tidak bisa dipenuhi oleh daerah Ibu Kota ini.

”Faktor penilaian IKLH antara lain hutan, udara, air, dan beberapa lainnya. Hutan jelas, Jakarta tidak punya. Makanya, IKLH Jakarta dari tahun lalu rendah,” kata Peni.

Menurut dia, Pemprov DKI Jakarta tak kurang berupaya agar lingkungan wilayahnya menjadi lebih baik. Salah satunya adalah adanya Hari Bebas Kendaraan Bermotor (HBKB).

Pelaksanaan HBKB dan terobosan disediakannya angkutan umum berbahan bakar gas, seperti bus transjakarta, telah membuat kualitas udara di Jakarta makin baik. HBKB kini rutin setiap hari Minggu pada pekan kedua dan keempat setiap bulan. Hari Minggu ini, misalnya, warga Jakarta bisa kembali menikmati kawasan di Jalan Jenderal Sudirman-MH Thamrin tanpa kendaraan bermotor, kecuali angkutan umum.

Clean Air Initiative, organisasi nirlaba yang dimotori peneliti- peneliti internasional, memberikan predikat kepada Jakarta sebagai salah satu kota besar di dunia yang berupaya keras memulihkan kondisi lingkungan.

”Tahun 2010, Clean Air Initiative menilai Jakarta dalam kategori ’Good’ dibandingkan tujuh kota lain di dunia, antara lain, Bangkok, Manila, Shanghai, New Delhi, dan Kathmandu,” kata Peni.

Namun, ia mengakui, Jakarta masih memiliki banyak pekerjaan rumah untuk mewujudkan kota yang lebih ramah lingkungan. Selain mengatasi masalah transportasi, ketersediaan ruang terbuka hijau (RTH) diakui harus terus digenjot.

Tambah delapan

RTH di Jakarta, khususnya di Jakarta Selatan, dipastikan bertambah luas. Selama 2010, ada penambahan delapan lokasi baru yang diwujudkan dengan cara pembelian lahan dan kemudian dikembalikan kepada fungsi awal sebagai RTH.

Kepala Suku Dinas Pertamanan Jakarta Selatan Heru Bambang mengatakan, kedelapan RTH itu tersebar di Kecamatan Pasar Minggu dan Cilandak dengan total luas 55.000 meter persegi.

Namun, jika dilihat dari fungsinya sebagai penambah areal resapan air ataupun pendaur ulang polusi udara, mungkin RTH yang ada di Jakarta masih jauh dari harapan. Sebagian besar RTH di Jakarta tidak berimbang antara banyaknya pohon besar dan lahan yang terbangun.

Sebagian besar tanah rata-rata tertutup plester semen dan beton. Data terakhir dari Dinas Pertamanan DKI Jakarta, dengan total luas Jakarta yang mencapai 661,52 kilometer persegi, luas RTH di provinsi ini baru 9,8 persen saja. (NEL/antara)

Peraturan Pemerintah No. 68 Tahun 2010 Bentuk dan Tata Cara Peran Masyarakat Dalam Penataan Ruang

Peraturan Pemerintah No. 68 Tahun 2010 Bentuk dan Tata Cara Peran Masyarakat Dalam Penataan Ruang PP68-2010

How far is Jakarta from becoming a livable city?

Hayati Sari Hasibuan, Jakarta | Sat, 01/22/2011 12:26 PM | Opinion A | A | A |
Jakarta has been serving as the capital of Indonesia and a center of business activities for decades.
With an area of 661.52 square kilometers, Jakarta is home to 9.6 million people (2010).
In addition, every workday approximately 1.1 million people enter Jakarta from the neighboring cities of Bogor, Depok, Tangerang and Bekasi for work or school.
How are people coping with daily life in Jakarta? Have we achieved livable city conditions? There are five fundamental aspects of livable cities: regional connections, walkability, strong neighborhoods, a network of attractive public spaces and affordability. Do we feel better and healthier? Let’s look at the conditions of our daily routines.
Have we ever thought that our daily commute to the office, school, or other activities should be a joyful, safe and interesting trip? Jakartans hardly find such a pleasant situation in their daily trip. Most of us, especially people from around Jakarta, start the day by leaving early in the morning, often before sunrise, to reach our destinations.
The number of private vehicles is estimated at 8 million which fill Jakarta’s streets, which account for only about 6.2 percent of the city’s total metropolitan area.
If the government relies only on the business as usual strategy to overcome the chaotic traffic, people will be trapped in congestion for a long time, rather than enjoying the trip. And slowly but surely, our daily trip will become a source of psychological stress.
Can we travel safely? How about walkability in Jakarta? We indeed want to be safe in all situations, including at home and during our trip to the workplace. However, the Jakarta Police revealed an 2.11 percent increase in the number of traffic accidents during the past year.
Accidents caused 938 deaths in 2010, which means two to three people are killed in traffic accidents every day on Jakarta’s streets.
There are also other dangerous impacts from traffic accidents, such as injuries leading to disability.
Traffic accidents across Jakarta caused around 3,000 serious injuries in 2010.
We often find the roadsides dedicated to pedestrians are full of street vendors and are dangerous.
Pedestrians may be struck from behind by motorcycles that intrude upon the sidewalk because they refuse to wait in traffic jams. With such a poor traffic situation, can we let our kids go to school by bike or on foot safely?
Furthermore, crime simply can’t take root in an alert and cooperative neighborhood. Unfortunately, when their habitants go for work and leave their homes, many neighborhoods become quiet and are sometimes prone to theft, vandalism or other criminal activities. To some extent the city spatial planning contributes to weakening neighborhoods, as it segregates the city into plush and cheaper residential areas.
How is the development of land use? Changes in land use along the roada is taking place as Jakarta is developing new sorts of property, such as apartments, office towers, shopping malls and hotels.
Up to now, there are 12 superblocks and more than 70,000 apartment units of across the city.
Shopping malls are also growing rapidly, with the number now standing at 90.
Shopping malls have become popular places for fun and recreation. But former Bogota mayor Enrique Penalosa says that “when shopping malls become public places, it is a symptom that the city is sick. Shopping malls exclude the poor.”
So far, the government has been pushing for policies oriented more for auto mobiles than mass transit. The government has made efforts to settle traffic problems by constructing and expanding new roads that connect new towns and satellite towns.
As a result, more demand for private cars is created and a reverse effect occurs — traffic congestion is not settled but worsens.
Every day when we are in the midst of the bustling chaos of Jakarta traffic we see huge billboards showing the smiling governor call on the residents to pay their tax on time. The livable city concept is as simple as making the city inhabitants smile like the governor. A livable city allows residents to make a living that gives joy, safety and comfort.
It is hard to do so, but as we make progress, the city will become more livable in tangible ways if it is easier for us to get where we need to be, where children are able to walk or bike to school safely, senior citizens can live more independently, neighborhoods are free from fear, people can spend less on transportation, the city is more economically competitive, the air is cleaner and people can live healthier lives.

The writer teaches urban and regional planning.

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